Weekly Head Voices #124: Ceci n’est pas d’ennui.

This edition of the Weekly Head Voices is a retrospective of the period from Monday June 26 to Sunday July 30, where with weekly I mean regular(ish), which is still better than absent. :)

We spent the first week of July about 100km to the south of Durban.

It was an epic winter break-away with the conditions so summery that we forgot that it’s technically speaking the middle of winter. Down to the beach every day, balmy evenings spent outside, brilliant runs through the KwaZulu-Natal hills and a holiday destination that has mastered the arts of happy-children-happy-parental-units all contributed to a brilliant week.

On the way back to the airport, we squeezed in a visit to uShaka Marine World, where we visited the dolphins, the aquarium and I joined the two oldest genetic offspring units zip-lining all over the water park.

The week after it was off to The Hague for mostly work and a few maximally cromulent social sessions with my besties.

Plans were made. Philosophical discussions were had. Fortunately, no planes were missed.

During all of this, OpenServe’s elves were busy digging up my neighbourhood installing these magical green tubes everywhere. They’re magical because soon they will be filled with super thin glass fiber, and then lit up with lovely lovely internet.

I really can’t wait.

On the evening before taking chances but not missing my flight home, the conversation spent a good amount of time on the topics of happiness, contentment and life goals.

As a reader of this blog, you will know by now that we’re not big fans of happiness. See the last bit of Weekly Head Voices #44 (6+ years ago…) which has what I think is a good summary of why we are not.

On the other hand, we have always thought that contentment is perhaps a more practical state to try and work towards.

There are however those who make the logical argument that contentment has been evolved out of us a long time ago, and that we are thus doomed never to find contentment for more than a few moments.

In WHV #64, following an old tradition of hiding backyard philosophy in arb blog posts, I suggested side-stepping the issue by not focusing on life goals, which are in essence a sort of end point which will invariably lead to post-achievement ennui, but instead focusing on setting and following a certain direction.

Life directions don’t have to have endpoints, but they can have waypoints. The difference is that you know that these are waypoints, and you accept that the journey continues until it finally stops forever.

Whatever the case may be, the conversation motivated me to start a new search for more scientifically-oriented literature on the topics of human happiness, contentment, life goals and so forth.

Up to now my search has not turned up very much. In a surprising turn of events, it seems that there is no shortage of people who are willing to sell you the literature-equivalent of snake-oil, in some cases knowingly but in most cases utterly oblivious.

Somewhere else during this same evening (it was a productive night), we provisionally added a third rule to the WHV’s Two Rules for Achieving Great Success in Life, or Just Surviving, Whichever Comes First.

The rules are now: 1. Be useful. 2. Be likeable. 3. Evolve.

I have been using rules 1 and 2 of the hitherto bi-ruled WHV’s TRAGSL-JS-WCF (pronounced TRAGSL-JS-WCF) as a central component in my GOUs education.

Rule 3 should be understood as actively and continuously upgrading oneself based on continuous introspection and retrospection.

I was initially hesitant to add a third rule to the previously perfect two-rule combo, but wise friend made good arguments for reminding system users of the important of deliberate and continuous self-improvement.

In 25 years I hope to be able to report back on the efficacy of this system based on a smallish but long-term study with N=3.

What do you think?

Weekly Head Voices #123: A semblance of a cadence.

Yes, we ended up in the mountains again.

In the period from Monday June 12 to Sunday June 25 we were mostly trying to get through the winter, fighting off a virus or three (the kind that invades biological organisms you nerd) and generally nerding out.

One more of my org2blog pull requests was merged in: You can now configure the thumbnail sizes your blog will automatically show of your uploaded images. Getting my own itch scratches merged merged into open source projects never fails to makes me happy, even although in this case there can’t be more than 5 other people who will ever use this particular functionality.

Anyways.

ASP.NET Core SURPRISE!

For a work project I was encouraged to explore Microsoft’s brand new ASP.NET Core. While on the one hand I remain wary of Microsoft (IE6 anyone?), I am an absolute sucker for new technology on the other.

You may colour me impressed.

If I had to describe it in one sentence, I would have to describe ASP.NET Core as Django done in C#. You can develop and deploy this on Windows, Mac or Linux. You model and query your data using Entity Framework Core and LINQ for example, or Dapper if you prefer performance and don’t mind the SQL (I don’t), or both. You write controller classes and view templates using the Razor templating language.

C# 7.0 looks like it could be a high development velocity language. It has modern features such as lambdas with what looks like real closures (unlike C++ variable capturing), as well as the null coalescing operator (??) and the null conditional operator (?.), the latter of which looks superbly useful. Between Visual Studio on Windows and the Mac, or the new Intellij Rider IDE (all platforms) or Visual Studio Code (all platforms), the tooling is top notch.

Time will have to tell how it compares to Python with respect to development velocity, a competition that Python traditionally fares extremely well at.

Where ASP.NET Core wins hands down is in the memory usage department: By default you deploy using the Kestrel web server, which runs your C# code using multiple libuv (yeah, of lightning fast node.js event loop fame) event loops, all in threads.

With Django I usually deploy as many processes as I can behind uwsgi, itself behind nginx. The problem is that with Python’s garbage collector, these processes end up sharing very little memory, and so one has to take into account memory limits as well as CPU count on servers when considering concurrency.

The long and the short of this is that one will probably be able to process many more requests in parallel with ASP.NET Core than with Django. With uwsgi and Django I have experimented with gevent in uwsgi and monkey patching, but this does not work as well as it does in ASP.NET Core, which has been designed with this concurrency model in mind from the get go. My first memory usage and performance experiments have shown compelling results.

Hopefully more later!

A cadence of accountability

Lately my Deep Work habits have taken a bit of a hit. At first I could not understand how to address this, until I remembered mention of a cadence of accountability in The Book.

Taking a quick look at that post, I understood what I had forgotten to integrate with my habits. Besides just doing the deep work, it’s important to “keep a compelling scoreboard” and to “create a cadence of accountability”.

Although I was tracking my deep work time using the orgmode clocking commands (when I start “deep working” on anything, I make an orgmode heading for it in my journal and clock in; when I’m done I clock out; orgmode remembers all durations) I was not regularly reviewing my performance.

With orgmode’s org-clock-report command (C-c C-x C-r), I can easily create or update a little table, embedded in my monthly journal orgfile, with all of my deep work clocked time tallied by day. This “compelling scoreboard” gives me instant insight into my weekly and monthly performance, and gives me either a mental kick in the behind or pat on the shoulder, depending on how many deep work hours I’ve been able to squeeze in that day and the days before it.

The moment I started doing this at regular intervals, “creating a cadence of accountability” in other words, I was able to swat distractions out of the way and get my zone back.

This is an interesting similarity with GTD (which I don’t do so much anymore because focus is far more important to me than taking care of sometimes arbitrary and fragmentary tasks) in that GTD has the regular review as a core principle.

Us humans being so dependent on habits to make real progress in life leads me to the conclusion that this is a clever trick to acquire behaviour that is not habitual: Work on an auxiliary behaviour that is habitual, e.g. the regular review, that encourages / reinforces behaviour that is perhaps not habitual, e.g. taking care of randomly scheduled heterogeneous tasks (GTD) or fitting in randomly scheduled focus periods (Deep Work of the journalistic variant).

As an aside, cadence in this context is just a really elegant synonym for habit. I suggest we use it more, especially at cocktail parties.

 

Weekly Head Voices #122:

Pink sunset, as they do here in my backyard.

Welcome back everyone!

During a brilliant breakfast chat with friends who are visiting from afar, friend S (now 16.67% name-dropped) admitted that the WHV, strange unfocused mishmash of thoughts that it is, contributed positively to his information diet.

In spite of this admission adding to my already considerable posting anxiety, I am enormously grateful for the encouragement. I often worry about this mishmash, as I also aspire to enter the fabled halls of A-list bloggers one day.

Perhaps I should just embrace the mishmash. Again.

In this edition of the mishmash, I extremely sparsely review the weeks from Monday May 8 to Sunday June 11.

During our weekly extra math, science and philosophy lessons, GOU#1 (now 11 years old) and I arrived through serendipity at the topic of Pythagoras. Her mind almost visibly expanded when she discovered the relationship between the 9, 16 and 25 square adjacent squares I drew for her on the 3-4-5 example triangle. Her eyes went wide when I explained that this works for any right-angled triangle.

She was soon happily squaring, adding (long-form on paper of course) and square-rooting away on geometry problems.

Seeing your own child discover the beauty that is math is brilliant.

After complaining about subpar android security and dismal android performance on this blog, I finally decided to bite the bullet and acquired a second-hand iPhone 6S 64GB on May 10, 2017. The phone is in mint condition, and the price was excellent.

So far, the performance is substantially better than any of my previous Androids. In fact, so far I’ve never had to wait for anything on this phone, which was my main issue with the Androids. (Google Maps anyone?!) Besides that, when Apple pushes a software update, all phones immediately get that update, without interference from any third parties, including carriers.

(A word to the wise: There is no official way to transfer your complete WhatsApp message history from Android to iPhone, which was a huge disappointment. There are unofficial, closed-sourced, solutions that require one to connect one’s Android phone in USB debugging mode to the PC. That risk is a bit too great for me.)

After a period of rest, the Visible Orbit website, including the high-resolution microscopic slice data and viewer, is online again! It was quite satisfying getting all of the backed-up data back on the interwebs again.

Since the previous WHV (well actually mainly during the last week), I’ve published five posts on my nerd blog:

Three of those five posts have to do with cryptocurrency, which is to a certain extent a reflection of my free-time mental cycles at the moment. Looking at how technology such as Ethereum and its Smart Contracts (a Smart Contract blog post is currently forming in the back of my head…) seem to be breaking through, I can’t help but be reminded of stories such as those by Charlie Stross in Accelerando (at least the first bits).

Do we find ourselves at the start of something truly significant, or is this just an extremely elegant and high-tech dead-end?

What a time to be alive!

P.S. Here, have another outdoorsy photo on the house!

I tricked GOU#1 and GOU#2 to join me on a sneakily long mountain walk. They did a sterling job.

Weekly Head Voices #121: Autumn tripping.

This post right here is Monday April 3 to Sunday May 7, according to at least one of the homunculi in my head!

The first stop on our East Coast autumn break road trip was Storms River Mouth Rest Camp. With the Indian Ocean smashing the rugged rocky shores, one would have to be forgiven if one were to describe the surroundings as epic, because this really is.

After a FOMO run in the rest camp itself (PRIMAL INDIAN OCEAN SEA WIND IN THE FACE YEAH) we family-walked the first few kilometres of the Otter trail, me with GOU#3 on my back. Here’s one impression of the view we were treated with:

After the Otter-trail-taster and a short rest, we hiked through the coastal forest in the other direction, to the mouth of the Storms River. The mouth can be crossed via an awe-inspiring hanging bridge:

By the time we got there, the longest bridge was blocked by a family of baboons, led by an extremely large male. Except for the promising Darwin-award candidate who thought that he could goad one of the baboons from the bridge and was promptly blocked by an extra baboon who got on the bridge behind him (baboons: 1, human: -9), the humans fortunately realised that these primates were not to be trifled with. (Darwin-award candidate was spared by the baboons, and hence did not win the award, at least not on that day.)

After a few days with family in St Francis, including a barefoot run on the beach (divine, but foot muscles were toast afterwards), we drove up to the Addo elephant park, and got to spend the night at the new Nyathi rest camp.

Nyathi is one of those places that gently but forcefully makes you go completely quiet when you arrive. I believe the term “gobsmacked” (by nature) is entirely suitable.

Surrounded by hills, with grassy plain stretching out before you, families of zebra and baboons going about their business and absolutely no digital connectivity of any kind, the best you can do is let all of that beauty smash inwards through all of your senses.

Let us drink from the firehose of natural beauty!

After a substantial amount of the abovementioned smashing, a great beer is in order. My current favourite is the Nine Inch Ale, not only because it reminds me of my favourite musician OF ALL TIME FOR EVER AND EVER, but because it’s really really tasty. Also, Red Rock Brewing Company has a genius label designer.

After the road trip, I tried to squeeze in as many days of work as possible before my Dutch homies arrived for the Burn… the AFRIKABURN.

With a really small crew of 6+1, this year we built and ran an official themecamp called BURNIVERSITY. The idea was to try and extract the best parts of going to university, namely the delight we experience when learning together, and to transplant them into Tankwa Town.

It took off absolutely beautifully!

After class, the BURNIVERSITY faculty gets to chill in the shade(ish).

As the week advanced, our small stretch tent filled each morning with visitors, both coming to learn and to teach. Besides our Yoga (best at the Burn so there) and Mindfulness (I gave those, I’m secretly very happy with how they went) classes, we had new and old friends teach Improv Theatre, Jazz Singing (this blew my mind, thank you Max), Non-violent communication, Hip Hop, the Anthropology of AfrikaBurn, and more.

The quality and depth of interactions we had with Burners from all over were just phenomenal.

Together with the rest of our adventures, it feels like I spent four weeks together with my besties in the desert, not one.

Already I look back with much sweet wistfulness.

(I have the start of a more detailed AfrikaBurn post in the drafts folder. I’m still considering whether I should finish it or not. Let me know in the comments what you would like.)

There’s still some dust that surprises me every now and then, and still some equipment that needs cleaning up and returning. In the meantime, I’ve sort-of accidentally stopped reading twitter, and I’ve sort of accidentally started checking facebook even less regularly than usual.

It seems that a week of talking more than usual about Mindfulness, doing more breathing and focus exercises with others, and, most importantly, connecting fully with fellow human beings (partially thanks to complete digital disconnection), might have scrambled my brain a tad.

Have a great week peeps, I hope to see you again soon!

Weekly Head Voices #120: May you live in interesting times.

(Warning: Due to the momentous events of the past week, this post is 80% South African politics. If this is not your thing, eject right before the large warning further down! Maybe next week we’ll be back to our usual programming, all depending on how above-mentioned momentous events play out.)

Between all of the retinal excitement of the (gorgeous) new Justice League trailer and the release of the new Ghost in the Shell movie (pretty but soulless the reviews seem to be saying), you might have missed the new Valerian trailer.

This would be a shame, because it looks mind-expandingly stunning:

On Tuesday, March 28, 2017, when I arrived home and Genetic Offspring Unit #3 (GOU#3 for short) saw me, she all-matter-of-factly stood up and walked towards me.

My heart burst.

WARNING: What’s happening in SA politics at the moment, in 60 seconds.

One would think that one heart bursting per week is sufficient, but on Friday morning this happened again for unfortunately far less than positive reasons.

We woke up to the news that our president Jacob Zuma had fired 9 ministers shortly before midnight.

Capable ministers, especially so Pravin Gordhan, the minister of finances (who was doing a great job trying to steer our fragile economy in the right direction, often opposing deals that were bad for the economy but great for the pockets of Zuma and his bosses, the Gupta brothers) were replaced with ministers who might indeed be capable, but have clearly been selected not for that but rather for their loyalty to the Zuma network.

Amongst many other ramifications, this also means that the 1 trillion Rand nuclear deal with Russia is officially back on the table!

This was one of the many unhealthy projects blocked by Pravin Gordhan.

Besides crippling our economy and enriching Zuma, his patronage network, and the Gupta brothers (they seem to be pulling many of the strings, including those of Zuma), we really don’t need these power plants.

Our country’s renewable energy programmes will be able to supply all of our energy needs in a cost-effective way for decades to come, without any new nuclear plants in sight, thank you very much.

Nuclear power certainly has its place, but under these circumstances definitely not.

This cabinet reshuffle is the most recent in a long line of increasingly destructive moves by president Zuma and his supporters. The country is still reeling from the billions of Rands that have been and are still being extorted from the poorest of citizens by a foreign company, all right under the nose of minister Bathabile Dlamini.

Guess who did NOT get fired on Friday?

Loyalty seems to be sufficient to cancel out any amount of malice, greed and/or incompetence.

However, people in the know expect serious fireworks the coming weeks.

I am hoping that they are right, and that these will be the right sort of fireworks. With a bit of luck and the willingness of many good-hearted and talented people who have started speaking out and coming into action, our country could soon find itself with the kind of leadership that it desperately needs.

Keep your fingers crossed. I look forward to seeing you on the other side!