Weekly Head Voices #150: The Road not Taken.

Photo of a cotula lineariloba flower, taken by GOU#1, age 12.

This edition of the WHV covers the week from Monday, July 23 up to and including Sunday, July 29.

Running update

Strava says I’ve just passed the 300km threshold in my Luna Mono 2 sandals.

It also says I’ve done 27km in my Xero Genesis sandals, or as I have begun to call them, Xero Tolerance.

You make one mistake, and something will break. You do get to keep all the bloody pieces.

In any case, when I started on this barefoot-style / natural running adventure, I had subconsciously set myself the limit of 200km before evaluating the success of the experiment.

At 200km, the experiment was still unsuccessful (different parts of feet and ankles were taking turns complaining) so I moved the threshold to 300km, with the plan to move it to 400km if required.

I call this The Stubborn Scientific Method(tm): You keep running the experiment (harr harr) until it says what you want it to say.

To be fair, in this specific case an injury would have (and still can), stop the experiment. Most fortunately the muscles, bones and tendons in my feet, ankles and calves, although complaining quite audibly, have held up.

This past Sunday I did a long(ish) run where it felt for the first time like my feet and ankles had finally toughened up enough (and perhaps my form had also improved slightly) to just keep on propelling me forward quietly and efficiently.

Together with the brilliant sunny winter morning conditions, this conspired to reconfigure my face machine into a rather long-lasting grin.

I am carefully optimistic that I might be able to make this specific adventure a more permanent one, and that makes me really happy.

The Emacs Section

NERD-ALERT. SKIP TO THE NEXT SECTION IF YOU ARE NOT INTO TEXT EDITORS!

A friend from work sent me a ZIP file with research data.

I was super surprised that I could easily decompress the ZIP file using Emacs Dired (Dired is of course the file-manager built into Emacs, doh), but that there was no easy way to mark and extract specific files from the archive.

I found an SO answer with a piece of Emacs Lisp code that someone had put together and integrated it with my Emacs.

It worked, but it didn’t default to the opposite Dired file-list pane as all commander-style tools should do, and by default it re-created relative paths, which is the opposite of the default in most two-pane commanders I know.

As is the wont of Emacs users, I reshaped the code ever so slightly to work like I thought it should.

Shaping Emacs Lisp code has a pleasant fluid feeling to it. Code is data, code is configuration, data flows through code.

I’m telling you this story, because it was a nice little reminder of one of the reasons I like this software so much.

You can find my modified version of archive-extract-to-file.el as a github gist.

The Odd Bits of Interesting News Section

  • Differentiable Image Parameterizations, a beautiful machine learning article on Distill that surveys and showcases different techniques for generating beautiful images with deep learning. These networks sort of learn to see in order to solve specific tasks, but you can tickle them in different ways to get them to show you the insides of their visual circuitry, and it’s quite beautiful.
  • The Prophylactic Extraction of Third Molars: A Public Health Hazard is an article which was published all the way back in 2007. It makes the claim that at least two thirds of wisdom tooth extraction are unnecessary. One could say that their only function is to… extract your money. BA DUM TSSSSS! To that I would like to add: WHY DENTISTRY WHY? HAVE YOU NOT HURT US ENOUGH?!
  • A colleague at work emailed this TechCrunch post about a 3D printed neural network that diffracts light going through in order to do its trained inference work on incoming images. Although it’s a retro-futuro-mind-bending idea to do it with a whole neural network, and it smacks of hell-yeah-this-is-what-scifi-promised-me-that-AI-would-look-like, I could not help but recall a certain Very Flat Cat telling us about this sort of passive light-based computation almost 20 years ago.

The Poetry Section

GOU#1 had to select an English poem to recite for class.

From the depths of my memory bubbled up The Road not Taken by Robert Frost.

I had forgotten how much subtlety and recognisable human complexity this poem was able to pack into such a petite little frame. If you have the time, read the analysis linked above after spending some time with the poem itself.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Friends, no matter which paths you take this week, I hope that we may meet again.

Weekly Head Voices #149: I forgot to proof-read this.

Part of the Sunday morning trail. Although I really enjoy these, I’m at my happiest running down antelope on the savannah.  Antelope strictly-speaking not required, but those wide open plains on the other hand…

This, the one hundred and forty ninth edition of the Weekly Head Voices, covers the week from Monday July 16 to Sunday July 22 of the year 2018.

This week, we have apple watch running adventures, deep learning in production (finally), yet another focus tip and finally a youtube poetry reading.

Enjoy!

The Apple Watch, Vitality and You

On Monday, I became the owner of a brand new Apple Watch 3, FOR FREE(ish).

I feel that two points are worth mentioning:

  1. Having one’s work macbook unlock automatically as one prepares to put one’s hands on the keyboard, with a sweet little unlock sound emitting from one’s watch, is much more fun than I had expected.
  2. One was looking forward to using third party running apps on the watch, such as iSmoothRun which does real-time reporting of cadence, which can be shown together with a number of other stats on a number of configurable screens a la Garmin . One has had to cancel these plans, because Vitality, the shadowy organisation responsible for the FOR FREE(ish) nature of the watch, only recognises runs submitted by the built-in Workouts app.
    • The September watchOS update will include runtime (haha) cadence, which is great. However, some technical system for the support of third party apps would have been even better. I’ll live.
    • Runs logged with the built-in Workouts app can be easily and automatically submitted to other platforms, such as Strava, where many of my running peeps hang out, and even to one’s own Dropbox in FIT format, with the HealthFit iOS app, a very reasonable once-off purchase.

DeepLearning Inside(tm)

On Friday, we shipped a new version of the most important work project I am currently involved in.

Again I feel that two points are worth mentioning:

  1. We now also have deep learning, albeit a humble example, out in actual production. I was starting to feel a little left out. Anonymous shout-out (because top secret) to the team members who made this happen!
  2. They say one should never deploy or ship on Friday. Because I come from the I-won’t-do-what-you-tell-me generation, I cut the final release on Friday evening after the traditional weekend-starter braai.
    • To be honest, this was only necessary because I had promised our client that we would release, and it was only possible because we have a fairly good test-suite, with end-to-end being most crucial in this specific scenario, and a checklist-style release procedure.

SoBSoDSiT-CIPWOB-FBA

As part of my chaotic but ever-evolving constellation of systems for maintaining work focus, I have renamed the shorter focus blocks approach to the short-but-specially-defined-so-that-completion-is-possible-within-one-block focus blocks approach (SBSDSTCIPWOB-FBA).

This adds the incentive of a small but probable shot of dopamine at the end of the focus block, and sometimes even leads to its unwitting extension by the woefully undersized (not to mention super lazy) rider sometimes sitting atop my mental elephant.

It sometimes feels like I’m slowly reinventing GTD.

(This blog post is an emotional roller coaster ride for me. This is the first time I’m feeling something.)

I used to be a fan of GTD when I still believed that my function in life was to answer emails really quickly, and master multi-tasking.

Since then however, I’ve slowly had to come to the realisation that, at least in my case, the amount of email processed is more or less exactly inversely correlated to the actual value that I produce.

The impotence of proof-reading

The following poetry reading made various subsets of my neurons fire in extremely pleasant ways.

I hope that you experience similar effects. See you next time!

Focus. [Weekly Head Voices #34]

On Monday, I took a stroll in the autumn with genetic offspring #2.

A mysterious path in the autumn. mysterious path + autumn = double the pensive power.

It was a stroll of somewhat above average duration. As one tends to do during this sort of stroll, I was thinking. Not the modern kind of internet thinking during which one’s line of thought gets interrupted at least three times per minute, but the old-fashioned kind, with stately, fully-formed thoughts of some complexity.

In a meta-thought moment, I had a taste of focus. The kind of focus that enables one to be fully in the moment. All thoughts of other things that need to be done, or have been done, or of other moments that one might prefer being in, are displaced by complete acceptance of the now, and one’s undivided attention.

The following bit of D.H. Lawrence seems to be a suitable conclusion to this post:

Thought, I love thought.
But not the juggling and twisting of already existent ideas.
I despise that self-important game.
Thought is the welling up of unknown life into consciousness,
Thought is the testing of statements on the touchstone of consciousness,
Thought is gazing onto the face of life, and reading what can be read,
Thought is pondering over experience, and coming to conclusion.
Thought is not a trick, or an exercise, or a set of dodges,
Thought is a man in his wholeness, wholly attending.

P.S. I’ve just registered for the Dolphins & Teleportation Symposium in Hawaii. I hope to see you there.