Weekly Head Voices #132: Potato deadline.

Fragment of potato skin, taken with phone camera through GOU#2’s microscope at 100x.

We have a serious deadline coming up on Tuesday, so I’m going to make these few WHV minutes count.

BULLET LIST TO THE RESCUE!

  • Day zero has again been postponed, this time to June 4. We continue with our water saving efforts.
  • That unexpected side-project I mentioned in last week’s post did end up going live that very night. Armed with the Django Rest Framework and plenty of battle scars, it took about 17 hours from idea to fully deployed REST API, a large part of which was debugging the paper’s math and spreadsheets.
    • Django might be a slow runner relative to some of the other kids on the block (go with any of its web frameworks, nginx with openresty (lua right in your web server!), even apistar with uvicorn), but the completeness and maturity of Django and its ginormous ecosystem are hard to beat when it comes to development velocity.
  • There’s a whole blog on the nature of note-taking. I arrived there via interleave and org-noter, both emacs packages for keeping text (orgmode) notes synchronised with PDFs, both found via irreal, a great Emacs blog.
  • In the extra lessons I have with GOU#1, we studied electrical current from basic (atomic) principles. As I was getting all excited about the outer electrons being passed on from copper atom to copper atom (Khan Academy and I tag team these lessons), GOU#1 had to laugh at the goose flesh on my arms.
    • The Khan Academy lecture seemed to imply that Benjamin Franklin started us down the not-quite-correct path of conventional current (from positive to negative), whereas the electrons being passed on imply current flow from negative to positive, aka electron current. However, this physics StackOverflow answer more completely explains that current is defined as the flow of electric charge, with electron flow being one example, and hence both directions are correct.
  • To be honest, I became ever so slightly irritated with an episode of one of my favourite podcasts, CPPCast, as the guest said “like” so often that I had trouble following what he was actually like trying to say. This like led me to using Google’s machine-learning-based speech to text API one night to like transcribe the audio of the podcast to speech so that I could like count the number of like utterances. There were not as many as I thought, but still a whole lot. If you’re curious as to the stats, I wrote everything up in this nerdy vxlabs blog post.
    • On the topic of note-taking: Because I make lab notes of everything in my Emacs, including late night speech recognition experiments, publishing a blog post is a question of some copy pasting, and then telling Emacs to publish to the blog.
  • On Thursday, some dudes came to my house and, after somehow switching seamlessly from pick-axe to optic fibre splicer and back several times, left me with this (and more):
Two fibre strands into my house. They tell me one is for backup.
  • These are strange Gibson-esque times when there’s now permanently a laser transmitting all of these packets to you via the network of glass strands encircling the Earth, whilst many of us are still struggling to grasp the difference between fact and fiction.
    • “The future is already here — it’s just not very evenly distributed”, William Gibson, probably ’93.
  • We have a new president: President Cyril Ramaphosa! He was Mandela’s choice to become president of this country, but it was Thabo’s turn, and then things went pear-shaped with Zuma. Years later, the situation is quite dire, but so far there are many indications that Ramaphosa has the makings of a great leader (I have become convinced that we humans, all of us, need great leaders to advance as humanity; I hope to write a post about that some day). After Friday’s state of the nation (SONA) address by present Ramaphosa, I, along with many fellow South Africans, are hopeful for our future.

Ok peeps, have a wonderful week! I’ll see you NEXT TIME!

Weekly Head Voices #131: Function over form.

Do you know what time it is?

It’s Sunday, which means it’s time for a new edition of the WHV!

GOU #2 has made what will probably be the most significant contribution to this week’s edition. I am happy that it’s in the form of an art piece, although I am slowly also growing quite excited at the prospect of one of my GOUs popping up here one day with an acerbic comment.

Our family through the eyes and hands of GOU#2 (age 7), also known as My Most Favourite Middle Child.

It was one of those really high intensity work weeks.

This is probably because a deadline is approaching at high speed. We are in good shape, but we wil have to work with an even slightly higher intensity in the coming week and a bit to deliver.

Water

Day Zero has been pushed out further to mid May, due to the generous contributions by farmers of the Groenland Water Association, and due to new calculations based on agricultural use tapering off slightly in the coming months.

This has had a very welcome positive effect on our stress level.

We continue with our household water saving efforts. On Friday, we were surprised by about 15mm of rain. Our various rain harvesting systems did an excellent job at further bolstering our emergency supplies.

No Fibre For You!

Last year in July, magical elves starting digging up my neighbourhood to install green trunking everywhere. As you all know, green trunking is for optic fibre. Anyways, “fast” forward 7 months, and the online fibre coverage map finally turned dark purple over my house. As you also all know, dark purple means my house can be hooked up to the giant net of laser conducting fibres encircling the whole earth.

Whilst the jocks never got any further than reminiscing monosyllabically about how awesome they were in high school 25 years ago, the nerds were busy wrapping our whole planet in a net of optic fibres to send exabytes of information everywhere at light speed.

On Saturday a gentleman from the telco was here to hook me up. I was understandably vibrating with excitement.

Unfortunately it turned out that this specific gentleman was sent too early.

He had come to hook my house up to the fibre which by then should already have been pulled into the building from the termination point on the street outside.

Anyways, he promised to arrange for the extending-fibre-from-street-into-house lady or gentleman to swing by, before he himself would come back again to wrap the whole business up.

I guess that when you work with things moving at the speed of light, time travelling faux pas are bound to happen.

What a tool

Speaking of nerds, I have finally found a multi-tool that is small enough to disappear into one of my pockets, yet enables me to make myself more useful at least once a day. After a long search (I’ve been walking around with a pen-sized screwdriver with 4 interchangeable bits in my pocket for the past time) I settled on the Gerber Dime.

It looks like this:

They say the best camera is the one you have with you. The same goes for tools.

My Leatherman Wave, recently replaced under the 25 year Leatherman guarantee with a Wave 2 because they didn’t have Wave parts anymore, is a brilliant tool, but it’s bulky and so it usually sits at the bottom of my back-pack, until I run into a problem which requires its steely persuasion.

In contrast, I can have the Gerber Dime out and pulling teeth, Ron Swanson-style, in a few seconds. The bottle opener is best in class, the blade is sharp, and the package opening blade makes short work of those irritating blister packs. I have not yet been able to test more extensively the pliers, the scissors, the screw-drivers and the tweezers, but the mere fact that this is the tool I always have with me means they will probably win the suburban leg of this contest.

Tool belts for humanity

One day, when I care even less about what strangers think, I am planning to start wearing a tool belt. Tool belts don’t have the best reputation, especially in sartorial circles, but they are amazing.

Along with hiking shoes and bulky multi-tools, they epitomise the philosophy that many engineers are born with, and a philosophy that could benefit the world at large:

Function over form.

To me this is an echo, or perhaps a specific case, of reason over emotion. Feels are certainly important, but if we are to advance as a society, rationality has to win.

Ok kids, I am about to push an unexpected side-project into production tonight. I wish you increased utility, and an exceptionally deliberate experience of life, at least until we see each other again!