Weekly Head Voices #120: May you live in interesting times.

(Warning: Due to the momentous events of the past week, this post is 80% South African politics. If this is not your thing, eject right before the large warning further down! Maybe next week we’ll be back to our usual programming, all depending on how above-mentioned momentous events play out.)

Between all of the retinal excitement of the (gorgeous) new Justice League trailer and the release of the new Ghost in the Shell movie (pretty but soulless the reviews seem to be saying), you might have missed the new Valerian trailer.

This would be a shame, because it looks mind-expandingly stunning:

On Tuesday, March 28, 2017, when I arrived home and Genetic Offspring Unit #3 (GOU#3 for short) saw me, she all-matter-of-factly stood up and walked towards me.

My heart burst.

WARNING: What’s happening in SA politics at the moment, in 60 seconds.

One would think that one heart bursting per week is sufficient, but on Friday morning this happened again for unfortunately far less than positive reasons.

We woke up to the news that our president Jacob Zuma had fired 9 ministers shortly before midnight.

Capable ministers, especially so Pravin Gordhan, the minister of finances (who was doing a great job trying to steer our fragile economy in the right direction, often opposing deals that were bad for the economy but great for the pockets of Zuma and his bosses, the Gupta brothers) were replaced with ministers who might indeed be capable, but have clearly been selected not for that but rather for their loyalty to the Zuma network.

Amongst many other ramifications, this also means that the 1 trillion Rand nuclear deal with Russia is officially back on the table!

This was one of the many unhealthy projects blocked by Pravin Gordhan.

Besides crippling our economy and enriching Zuma, his patronage network, and the Gupta brothers (they seem to be pulling many of the strings, including those of Zuma), we really don’t need these power plants.

Our country’s renewable energy programmes will be able to supply all of our energy needs in a cost-effective way for decades to come, without any new nuclear plants in sight, thank you very much.

Nuclear power certainly has its place, but under these circumstances definitely not.

This cabinet reshuffle is the most recent in a long line of increasingly destructive moves by president Zuma and his supporters. The country is still reeling from the billions of Rands that have been and are still being extorted from the poorest of citizens by a foreign company, all right under the nose of minister Bathabile Dlamini.

Guess who did NOT get fired on Friday?

Loyalty seems to be sufficient to cancel out any amount of malice, greed and/or incompetence.

However, people in the know expect serious fireworks the coming weeks.

I am hoping that they are right, and that these will be the right sort of fireworks. With a bit of luck and the willingness of many good-hearted and talented people who have started speaking out and coming into action, our country could soon find itself with the kind of leadership that it desperately needs.

Keep your fingers crossed. I look forward to seeing you on the other side!

 

The 2016 to 2017 transition post.

Following the rich tradition over here of year transition posts, having just rounded off a brilliant outdoorsy take-your-mind-off-of-everything vacation with friends, and also inspired by wogan.blog’s nicely personal 2016 review post, I decided that a farewell-2016 how-you-doin’-2017 post was in order.

By the way, by rich tradition I mean that I wrote the grand total of one (1) similarly titled post previously, as the year ticked from 2009 to 2010, and at least one other, disguised as a weekly head voices, as we entered 2012That last one is worth another read, early 2012 cpbotha had some really good tips. There might be more such posts, this blog has been around for more than 15 years and much of what I’ve written is not available from my short-term memory, which is nice.

Warning: This post is long (1800 words+), rambly and sometimes even a bit mushy. I hope you enjoy it!

2016: The Review

The bad, with a hopefully slightly positive outlook at the end

Let’s get the bad stuff out of the way as soon as we can…

For me the biggest disappointments of 2016 were the double-whammy of the Brexit followed by the Trumpocalypse.

I really did not expect either of these events to go the way they did.

This is probably because I was, ever the optimist, over-estimating the level of human development of British and US voters.

The exclusionist, nationalist, xenophobic and in many cases even white supremacist thinking associated with Trump’s support in the US and the Leave vote in the UK are truly abhorrent.

I understand that there were many other factors at play. However, these voters were either throwing out the baby with the bath water, or, much much  worse, agreeing with the abhorrent sentiments mentioned above. Especially this second possibility depressed me greatly after the US election.

After such setbacks, one needs to look for solutions.

After Brexit, analysis showed that education level was the strongest indicator of a vote for leave or remain. Higher education was strongly associated with remain, whilst the opposite was the case for leave.

Leave / remain voter analysis by The Atlantic. Click to go to article + interactive version of this graphic.

For Trump voters, you probably guessed it, it was more or less the same idea. Less educated citizens voted for Trump, more educated citizens for Clinton.

This is yet another strong indication that we should really be pouring every resource we have into the education of our people. (yes, correlation and causation, I know. hence the terms “strong indication”. discuss in the comments if you like.)

Lawrence M. Krauss, superstar theoretical physicist and author of the book A Universe from Nothing, recently tweeted this 1920 quote by H.G. Wells:

Human history has become, more and more, a race between education and catastrophe.

The way things are going now, that thought, and movements like #feesmustfall, are more important than ever. There can be absolutely no excuse for neglecting the highest quality and accessible education (basic up to tertiary) of future generations of humans whom we expect to further our civilization.

The running and the mindful

In 2016, I ran 440km.

There are a great deal of people who have run much more than that, but those are my 440 kilometers and somehow they brought me a great deal of deep satisfaction.

During the year, my per-run distance and speed have gradually increased.

Besides fitness gradually increasing, I discovered experimentally that shorter, quicker steps get me further and a higher pace. It took a biomechanical friend to explain to me that this was about muscles operating within the more efficient middle of their full extension/contraction ranges. I could probably just have read this somewhere, but doing it the hard way and then having a friend explain it on top of Table Mountain definitely added something to the experience.

For the last 200 kilometres or so, I have listened to the exact same album: Skin by Flume. Every single run, I start that exact same album with the exact same sequence of tracks. As I learned from the SwimGeek’s blog, finding your soundtrack and putting it on repeat whilst exercising is apparently a thing.

With the surroundings over here being what they are, it does not take much to slip into a state of mindfulness.

No doing, no planning; just absorbing all of the surroundings, physical and mental, the music, and feeling how the meat-based machine that houses me propels us forward.

On the topic of mindfulness, for the last few months I added a repeat event to my todoist, helping me to spend five minutes every morning before work doing the breathing exercise. More recently I do this without any voice track, but previously Prof. Mark Williams at one point would say (original quote is due to Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD):

Each breath a new beginning; each out-breath a letting go.

There’s a whole lot in there. I have spent quite some time with it and I am far from done.

The blog

The first rule of blogging: You don’t blog about blogging.

However, I hope you don’t mind me breaking that rule to mention that in 2016, this blog was viewed 133 thousand times. I already get happy when one other person reads a post. You can imagine how happy it makes me to know that there are even slightly more people who have come here to consume some of the words I have written, and even some who have taken the time to leave behind comments!

The lion’s share of those views were due to focused posts that got picked up by some of the more popular nerd sites. I have to admit that I derived the most enjoyment from the more personal posts that were only read by friends.

Whatever the case may be, this has to be my most satisfying hobby. Thank you for the crucial role that you who read play in it!

The new life

In early(ish) 2016, our third daughter, affectionately known as Genetic Offspring Unit #3 (GOU#3 for short) around these parts, was born.

This wonderful little cellular mega-cluster is currently making noises that have the primary purpose of being immensely cute, but are also slowly starting to make sense. Her ambulation capabilities have increased immensely, and she is on the verge of standing up by herself and so we will probably have to re-arrange our interior. Again.

Long ago, I wrote here about my unexpected new role as someone else’s Tooth Fairy. In the meantime, working as a part-time tooth fairy and a full-time papa to three little humans has turned out to be a more fulfilling career than I ever could have imagined.

2017: Not much planned yet, you?

I prefer making resolutions in secret, then carrying them out or not, and only then reporting on them. However, that would mean that I would have to wrap up this post right now, and for that I’m not quite ready yet.

Experiment Alcohol Zero

One resolution that I am already executing on, is performing an interesting little experiment. After reading about the effects of alcohol on one’s (running) performance and general energy levels, I have decided to go for 30 days without a drop of alcohol to try and get a subjective idea of its potential impact.

Those of you who have spent more than 8 seconds in my or my blog’s vicinity know that I absolutely adore craft beer (this includes local, but also special beers of the Belgian type) and local wines, both of which are regularly consumed by me and “business partners” during “business lunches” in the not-unattractive local surroundings.

This decision was not taken lightly.

It is mid-morning of day 2 of Experiment Alcohol Zero (EAZ) as I write this. With the air full of smoke due to local vegetation fires, I have not been able to go running yet, but I am imagining that my energy lasted later last night, and I got up easier this morning. I have 29 more days to investigate.

Reminders for a hopefully better life

Every day, I remind myself to be the kindest I can possibly be to everyone I come into contact with. We have infinite amounts of kindness to spread.

I also remind myself to be grateful. It takes continuous practice to identify the many things one can be grateful for every day, but it is definitely worth it.

I often remind GOU#1 (#2 and #3 are not old enough yet for this lesson) that, besides the guidelines above, we have to keep on working on two more related characteristics: being useful, and being likable.

Being useful means continuously developing and refining skills that enable one to contribute value to one’s surroundings. Being likable means understanding and appreciating how we humans stick together. Kindness, see above, is an important component of this.

In 2017, I would like to write more (on this blog probably), and read more.

Rapidly morphing goalposts jumping randomly through even more randomly pulsating hyperspace, with a slightly positive outlook at the end

Yes folks, this is going to be my parting thought.

When I was much younger, I used to believe that one’s life could be “cracked”. That is, if you searched, and you worked really hard at understanding yourself, your people and your surroundings, you could come up with some kind of answer with which you would be able to attain contentment.

In the meantime I’ve come to the realisation that that Much Younger Me, although quite dashing, was of course utterly wrong.

Life is utterly dynamic. You Now are a different person from You Last Year. The same goes for people around you, and the same goes for everything around you.

The goal posts are not just moving all the time, they are an illusion flashing in and out of an hallucinogenic and especially dynamic perception.

One trick to help one deal with this, is to stop thinking about goals in the first place, and instead consider the directions of your movement.

Also keep in mind that there are no answers, only choices. You work to make the best ones you can with the means at your disposal at that moment.

Importantly, in this restless environment, some peace can be found by realising that a large part of the restlessness originates from within you. Fortunately, you have slightly more say in you than you have in your surroundings.

What one can do then, is nicely summarised by Prof. Mark Williams in the audio accompanying his mindfulness book:

The deep stillness we seek does not arise because the world is still or the mind is quiet. Stillness is nourished when we allow things to be just as they are for now, in this moment, moment by moment and breath by breath.

The End (for now)

Alright friends, that was it from me, for now. I hope that you have the best 2017 possible. I hope especially that your kindness and that of those around you flows deeply and freely.

As a parting gift, here is the high-resolution panoroma I made from the top of Table Mountain, after hiking up Platteklip Gorge with friends:

The view from the top of Table Mountain, photo by cpbotha.net. Click for high-res.

Weekly Head Voices #111: A swift hack.

Well hello friends! In this here,the one hundred and eleventh edition of the Weekly Head Voices, I present a personal view of selected events that took place in the time between Monday, July 25 and Sunday, August 14 of 2016.

Post summary: HackerNews FastMail to Gmail retrospective (WARNING NERD CONTENT), Craft Beer tips, Swift Playgrounds (teach your kids to code!) and a tiny bit of backyard philosophy at the end.

The HackerNews effect

When I submitted my Moving 12 years of email from GMail to Fastmail blog post to HackerNews last Monday, it was after some consideration, and with considerable trepidation. The previous time a similar post of mine was picked up by the HN frontpage (and reddit) in 2013, it resulted in a great number of fairly harsh insults flung my way (the harsh ones seem to hit much harder than the many more constructive ones can compensate for). The problem is not having your work criticised, it’s rather being ad hominem’ed into the ground.

The internet can unfortunately get quite bad that way.

However, this time the internet was in a good mood!

As a Z-list (aka hobbyist) blogger, I already get quite excited when even two people find something entertaining or educational in my blog, so you can imagine my excitement when I saw my blog stats jump into the thousands during the first hour after hitting the HN front page.

646 upvotes, 365 comments (in the HN discussion) and more than 50 thousand blog post views later (!!), my asbestos suit is still in storage, and the box of kleenex (for drying up my tears) is still unopened. I am very happy with the healthy and mostly happy discussion both on HN and here on the blog.

A taste of my secret beer notes

In my travels around the world (ok, maybe just in a few hundred kilometre radius of where I live) I taste many exotic and strange drinks (okay, maybe just the local craft beers). Here’s an excerpt from my top secret beer notes for your reading and hopefully soon tasting pleasure:

Stellies Bosch Weiss
Stellies Bosch Weiss

The Stellies Bosch Weiss is is a refreshing white beer which I can imagine enjoying much more in 35 celsius. However, I find it way too gassy for my taste and thus give it 0.4 on the Celis White scale. As everyone knows, Celis White is the best white beer in the world. I’m also not the biggest fan of CBC’s Krystal Weiss because of its gassiness. This could also be a German vs Belgian thing.

The Darling Brew Bone Crusher is probably a 0.8 on the Celis scale, and scores mega bonus points for choosing such a heavy metal name.

Citizen Beer's Patriot Lager
Citizen Beer’s Patriot Lager

Citizen Beer has a real knack for naming beers; so this weekend I was able to do my patriotic duty (ha ha) by enjoying their Patriot lager. Fortunately, they also have a great knack for making lovely beers. This lager is more than hoppy enough to remind you that it’s a craft, but at the same time it is refreshingly light.

Devil's Peak Lager
Devil’s Peak Lager

Not completely coincidentally, I also tasted the Devil’s Peak Lager this weekend. There are subtle differences between it and the Patriot which I will only be able to describe after more tasting. For now: Same lightness, but with enough hop. Highly enjoyable.

Devil's Peak Pale Ale
Devil’s Peak Pale Ale

As I’ve mentioned before, it’s no coincidence that happiness and hoppiness look so similar. The Devil’s Peak Pale Ale was a superbly hoppy (about 239% more hoppy than the lager) and full flavoured conclusion to the weekend. In spite of its full body this Cape Town beer’s alcohol content is lower than I would have expected: Only 4%.

First impressions of Swift Playgrounds

I might or might not have acquired a new iPad Air 2 with the primary motivation of being able to test the new Swift Playgrounds on Genetic Offspring Unit #1 (now 10 years old). This is a new and attractive iPad-only app that has been designed by Apple to teach kids how to program in Swift. Note that you’ll have to upgrade to iOS 10 Beta to get the app, at least until iOS 10 is officially released. One of the exercises looks like this (image taken from the website):

Screen Shot 2016-08-14 at 6.25.43 PM

Previous experiments with scratch and with processing have met with limited success but no permanence. However, GOU#1 is an iPad fanatic, and the potential of getting her addicted to the programming bug is just too fantastic to let this opportunity go by.

On the first day, she was already writing functions and for loops in Swift in order to navigate a cute alien solving puzzles on a 3D landscape.  I was looking over her shoulder now and then: The educational content and execution of the app is impressive. Besides the built-in puzzle worlds such as the 3D one pictures above, you can create your own Swift projects from scratch. These projects can use iPad hardware such as bluetooth and the camera, but we’re not quite there yet. Apple has also promised to keep on expanding the educational content.

I’m really crossing my fingers that GOU#1 will keep at it. If Swift Playgrounds helps to get her programming, I might just have to go full fanboy.

∞♥

This past Friday at the breakfast table, Genetic Offspring Unit #2 asked her mom how much she thought GOU#2 loved the baby GOU#3, upon which the mom asked “How much do you love GOU#3?”.

GOU#2 answered: Infinitely much!

My fragile parental unit heart almost exploded with happiness at this point. It’s what I tell GOU#1 and #2 when I put them to bed, and every morning when I drop them at school. (GOU#3 herself does not yet parse our language.)

Ok kids, it looks like there’s an infinite amount of the good stuff to go around. You know what to do!

bettys_bay_somewhere
I went jogging (or rather walking with a two-step now and then). Enjoyment of surroundings and physical activity was quite intense at this point in spacetime: 15:55 on August 7, 2016; GPS coordinates in EXIF data.

Weekly Head Voices #108: Gaga.

I was reminded that future me really enjoys having written these things. (Present me knows about extrapolation.)

interested in time travel

Actually present me also enjoys this, but creating sufficient amounts of time to do so is often challenging. I have most recently convinced myself that I should see this as practice so that I will later be able to write really entertaining posts in minimal time. Until then my two readers, I hope to compensate with edification.

Genetic Offspring Unit (GOU) #3, the rapidly glowing cellular mega-city that first made contact with extra-wombular (I made that up) light slightly more than three months ago, suddenly started babbling a few weeks ago. To be honest, I thought that she was going to be really quiet to compensate for the immense amount of continuous talking in my house. It turns out that her reaction has instead been one of taking this bull by the horns. SHE WILL BE HEARD. (GOU#1 and #2 are able to produce speech with an intensity that is to be heard to be believed. I have no idea where they got that from.)

Speaking of babbling, I sometimes make videos of me trying to explain nerdy programming-related tricks, and then I upload them to YouTube. My most recent creation is about using the conan.io C++ package manager to get a small SFML-based GLSL example going (that’s GPU programming). It has a soundless explosion at the end!

I came across a really interesting bit of research performed at the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU) on how really small, seemingly inconsequential rewards, can actually ignite people’s intrinsic motivation. This is interesting exactly because it has long been thought that extrinsic rewards diminish intrinsic motivation, a phenomenon called the overjustification effect.

In the recent study by researchers at the WU, students were encouraged to do extra homework assignments. However, this was done by allocating an amount of extra credit which was perceived by the students as being trivial (this was measured in a separate study). Lo and behold, this perceived trivial extra credit still jump-started that group’s extra assignment submissions, and the students in that group then showed evidence of autonomously (intrinsically) motivated behaviour.

The researchers hypothesise that this could be due to the fact that the students being jump-started could not internally explain their behaviour on the basis of the negligible reward, and hence automatically came up with more intrinsically-oriented motivations, such as personal importance, interest or enjoyment).

South Africa is a really strange and wonderful place. I don’t write about it that much, because in that respect it is my place to be quiet here in the background. However, sometimes someone else writes something that, if you’re interested in the perspective of South Africans who’ve lived abroad for a significant amount of time, and have then returned, somewhat the wiser, because the country in their blood called them back, you really should read. Disco Pants, or rather her blog, helped me a whole lot when we had to decide whether we would be coming back or not. She has a new post out titled “On Surviving the Madness of South Africa”, and it’s a beaut.

On the topic of beauty, Flume has new album out. It’s called Skin, and it gets the highly coveted but completely unknown Weekly Head Voices Album of Right Now award! Here’s the first track to whet your appetite (or not):

Have a fun week listeners!

Weekly Head Voices #105: There will be tears.

Congratulations, you have successfully completed the week of Monday February 8 to Sunday February 14, 2016!

About 4 seconds after posting previous edition WHV #104 to Facebook with the “When you’re a vegan <boy with bulging veins> and haven’t told anyone in 10 minutes” meme image included, friend Ivo T. zinged me with this reply:

12651073_10153234132252035_804640390912092906_n

So much truth. I have been put back in my place. Sorry vegans. Sorry MBA students. Not sorry Ayn Randers.

This is currently my favourite lager ever (at least until next week):

Jack Black Brewers Lager

It is indeed a craft beer. If we’ve ever chatted more than 10 minutes in the past (or in the future), you’ll know everything about my braai, and you probably also know that I find craft beer to be one of the greatest inventions ever, along with fire, and the internet.

Here’s a another beer which I recently had the pleasure of enjoying, at a secret networking meeting (yes, we have secret meetings where we in fact do manage a large number of aspects of your daily life, and where we also orchestrate it so you’ll never suspect that we are behind everything, subtly manipulating reality) where, when the beer arrived at the table, everyone who looked vaguely hipster-like claimed vocally not in fact to be even remotely hipster-like:

Tears of the Hipster Beer

META-HIPSTER CRAFT BEER! At first I was confused, but then I realised it was just another case of WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!

(By the way, I stripped the EXIF GPS data from the Jack Black photo, because privacy, but I left it hidden in the tears of the hipster. First one who tells me in the comments where the secret meeting was held gets a free craft beer!)

Nerd tip of the week: It’s somehow not prominent enough on their site, but GitLab, the open source GitHub alternative, also offer free hosting of an unlimited number of private repositories with an unlimited number of private collaborators. In other words, if you’re on a budget, you can host your commercial and proprietary project git repositories (and bug tracking and wikis) there at no cost. This is cheaper than github ($7 for the smallest subscription for 5 private repos) and better than bitbucket (private repos for free, but if you have more than 5 team members you have to pay). I pay quite gladly for the online services I use, but in this particular case, such a level of free is hard not to like.

Nerd tip #2 of the week: The Clang static C++ analyser is brilliant. If you program in C++, and you need to up your game, integrating this into your workflow is a solid step in the right direction. I’ve been using this via the scan-build method. Let me know in the comments if you’d like to know more about this!

After some professional ethernet cabling down to the sort-of basement of our new house, I have checked off another item from my non-existent bucket list: We now have a lab at our house. So far there are computers, all kinds of DIY supplies and art stuff for the genetic offspring units, and all of this to create. I spent some of the best times of my life in labs of some sort of another. It’s really great bringing some of that back home to my clan.

Have a great week kids, see you on the other side!