Weekly Head Voices #134: SCARF.

Untitled artwork by GOU#2 (age 7), who is also known as My Most Favourite Middle Child.

I somehow forgot to take photos this past week. At the very last moment, GOU#2 delivered, as if commissioned, the piece shown above.

The WHV visual element lives to fight another day!

The rest of this post is divided into three parts: One for the programming nerds, one for the running nerds and one for the arm-chair psychologists. Feel free to pick and choose!

C++ quo vadis?

This week, we spent more than a day chasing an elusive memory-related access violation (big words for “crash”) in the software we recently released.

In the end, the bug was only really reproducible on Windows 7 (not on Linux, not on macOS, and only with great difficulty and infinite patience on Windows 10). It turned out to be hidden deep in a well-tested, industry-backed open source C++ library.

This and the specific nature of this bug again demonstrated to me that C++, although I love it dearly, simply has too many well-disguised flaws (let’s call them foot-guns) which will eventually lead to even the most experienced and sharp programmer making mistakes.

In spite of the recent language renaissance (C++11, 14, 17 with 20 imminent) and a slew of improvements, it’s still too easy to write unsafe code.

With contenders like rust (rustlang AJ, rustlang!) which enable programmers to write programmes which have C++-level performance but are by default safe, could C++’s days be counted?

Run

It was time to retire my trusty pair of Asics Cumulus 18 shoes.

They had clocked just over 900km, which is perhaps a little too much. By the end, I could feel the bones in my big toe’s main joint (apparently also known as the big-toe’s MTP or¬†metatarsophalangeal joint) crunching down with each strike.

Normally not prone to these types of visits, I had no choice but to pop out to the Run Specialist Store in Edward street on Thursday to get a new pair of activity-proof foot covers.

They let me run on a treadmill (whoohooo running!) with a high-speed video camera. In the footage, we could see that indeed my conversion to forefoot running had been successful (which was good to hear, because it had cost me about 100km of pain), but that I tended to land on the outsides of my forefeet.

The minimal shoes I had had in mind were not (yet) to be.

Instead the run doctor prescribed a pair of Saucony Kinvara 8s, which make my old Asics look like previous generation gardening shoes. I’ve since taken these out on two runs. They are super light, and super springy (everun FTW?), but I have to say that I have my doubts about the durability of the outsole. I’ll report back.

In February, I’m pretty happy that I managed to squeeze in just over 110km of running, which is not too shabby (by my standards, as always!) for the short month.

SCARF

Yes, winter is coming, but this, although also quite useful, is not that type of SCARF.

I am still reading David Rock’s book Your Brain at Work, and SCARF is his mnemonic for Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness and Fairness.

These are five social needs, the threat or confirmation of which can have profound effects on humans.

If you feel that you are being unfairly treated, for example, this triggers a low-level threat response which fundamentally complicates dealing rationally with a situation.

Conversely, if for example an interaction grants you more certainty or even better autonomy, you are magically able to contribute significantly more cognitive capacity and creativity to that interaction.

Both the fundamental threat and reward responses go for all five of these qualities. Once you know what to look for, it’s easy to go through some of your memories and to see where one or more of the SCARF needs played a role.

Although one (hopefully) mostly intuitively integrates this in one’s daily dealings, I think it’s super useful being able to enumerate the SCARF social needs like this. It helps when managing oneself in any situation (especially when your prefrontal cortex is exhausted, which is just about always), and it certainly helps when you might find yourself in position where you are able to contribute to another human’s well-being.

The end

Have a great week friends, I hope to see you again soon!

P.S. if there are any arduino uno -> hardware serial -> xbee experts in the audience, I would like to have a word. (sparkfun shield. with software serial can talk to xbee. with hardware serial, and sparkfun switch in the right position, xbee won’t respond. uno is a robotdyn clone.)

Weekly Head Voices #92: The cake is a lie.

A random winter’s day view from Del Vera, where father’s day was celebrated.

The week of Monday June 15 to Sunday June 21 in bullets:

  • Ran around organizing all kinds of things for the new house. The various institutions have been cooperating very nicely.
  • Spent days trying first to fix an implementation of a GPU algorithm to simulate car paint, and then to implement an alternative algorithm by the clever boys and girls at NVIDIA. A team-mate finally got everything working by realising that the float16 texture coordinates (long story) we were using to sample a noise texture needed to be float32. Lesson learnt: If you’re seeing splotches when you’re supposed to be seeing snow, check your float precision!
  • Spent the rest of the week fighting with wkhtmltopdf, a tool that converts HTML into PDF. Unfortunately the tool is 50% webkit, and 50% black magic. Lesson learnt: wkhtmltopdf 0.12.2.1 renders internally at 74.8dpi. Accept it, calculate with it, and move on. The upshot of this is that the IP Dashboard is now 37% better at exporting charts.
  • For some time now, when I have to make decisions, I actively optimise for experiences and not for possessions. At some point in the past I read in the blogosphere that experiences make people happier than possessions, and since then I’ve been paying more attention to this. IT REALLY WORKS!(tm) Tonight I wanted to look up the sources of this idea for you (and for me). Here are the two academic papers causing most of that online discussion, and a summarising blog post::

    Carter and Gilovich’s research (based on on a number of tests and questionnaires they did with a sample of Cornell students) demonstrated that experiences were more satisfying than possessions. Their results also support at least one explanatory mechanism: Experiences are more closely connected to the self. This makes sense: Anybody else can buy the same thing you bought, but, by definition, your experience of some event or adventure is quite unique to you. To my mind, the idea of focusing on the experience rather than the cake at the end is pleasingly complementary to the adage that Life is a journey, not a destination, which I have just learned is due to Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • I’m still terrible at bullets, I know.

Dear reader(s), have a beautiful and experience-filled week!