The Apple TV 4 Remote, nickname “Achilles”!

It turns out that when you, or one of your offspring, accidentally drop an Apple TV 4 remote from about a metre, the lovely touch surface shatters almost exactly like the screen of a smartphone:

Unfortunately, you now have to purchase a new remote, which over here is going to cost more than half of what the whole Apple TV unit, including remote, cost initially.

Weekly Head Voices #116: Nothing much to see here, please move on.

This WHV is all about the weeks from Monday January 30 to Sunday February 12, 2017. I’ve mostly been in heads-down mode on two projects, so this post will be shorter than is usually the case.

I had my very first beer after the 30-day long Experiment Alcohol Zero (EAZ) on Friday, February 3. It was a good one:

EAZ has taught me that it would not be the worst idea to limit alcohol consumption slightly more.

As with many other enjoyable things, there is a price to be paid for this enjoyment. If paying that price interferes with the other enjoyable habits in your collection, it makes sense to evaluate and adjust the balance.

That reminds me of one of my favourite electronic music productions of all time: Balance 014 by Joris Voorn. He blew everyone’s minds when he decided to paint these fantastic soundscapes by mixing together more than 100 tracks, often 5 or 6 at a time.

Right at this point, just after that not-quite non sequitur, I wrote a far too long section on the relative performance of Android and iPhone, with a big “nerd content ahead” warning on it. Fortunately for you, I came to my senses before publishing and copied it out into its own little blog post: Android vs iPhone performance: A quick note.

Last weekend I dusted off my trusty old mu4e, an unbelievably attractive email client, again. This means I’m reading your mail and sending you beautifully UNformatted plain text emails right from my Emacs. As an additional bonus, I put all of the boring details about my configuration into a completely separate blog post, which you don’t have to read, titled: mu4e 0.9.18: E-Mailing with Emacs now even better.

What I will mention here and not in the other post, is that the current situation is subtly different from my previous adventure with mu4e: Where I previously synchronised all 60 thousand emails to process locally with mu4e, I am now following a more mellowed approach where I’m only synchronising the current year (and perhaps the previous year, still considering) of email. I use the fastmail web-app for searching through longer term storage.

I’m happy to report that so far it’s working out even better than the previous time. I really enjoy converting HTML emails (that’s what everyone sends, thanks GMail!) to well-behaved plain text when I reply.

Finally, after the Nth time that someone shared a clearly bogus science news post on Facebook, instantly bringing my blood to the boil, I decided to write a handy guide titled: Critical Thinking 101: Three super easy steps to spot poppycock on the internet.

This guide is 100% free, and really easy to send to your friends when you think this is necessary. Please let me know if you have any suggestions for improvement.

Ok kids, that’s it from me for now. I wish you a great week ahead. In the words of Yo-Play: Come on Mitch, don’t give up. Please try again.

Android vs iPhone performance: A quick note.

I’ve been spending some time doing research on the relative (perceived) performance of flagship Android phones compared to iPhones. I will probably not write the extended post I was planning to, as it seems that it’s hard to answer this question scientifically, and, perhaps more importantly, it makes people Very Very Angry.

I would still like to leave you with some interesting reading material. Hence this quick note.

From this discussion post (December 2016) by CodingHorror, aka Jeff Atwood, one of the two founders of the whole StackOverflow empire, where he measures the relative performance of his discourse web-app, the following choice quote:

Some Android users report up to about 29 score on very new late
2016 Android devices, depending on the vagaries of the browser
used. Still below the 2013 iPhone 5s which can be purchased used for about $150 these days.

That’s pretty amazing: Based on the browserbench speedtest, which is supposed to reflect quite realistically real-world web-browsing performance, the 2013 iPhone 5s outperforms 2016 Android flagships. Ouch.

My Snapdragon 808 does a measly 14.7 on browserbench. The iPhone 5s which is a year or two older does more than double that.

There are more sites where this discussion / flamewar is being continued. Google is your friend.

The core argument is that Apple long ago made the call that fewer, more high performance CPU cores would give the best subjective performance. In other words, to a user the phone would feel more responsive.

This does make sense: As a user, when I tap a button, I would like to see an instantaneous response. A single really fast core is going to help more with this than a higher number of slower cores.

Furthermore, programming single-threaded apps is significantly easier than programming robust and efficient multi-threaded apps. You can guess what the apps in the various stores look like in this regard.

The iPhone 6s had only two cores, whereas most mid- to high-range Androids had 6 or more cores when the 6s was released.

The iPhone 7 A10 chip has finally made the jump to 4 cores, two of which are lower power cores. Still, it turns out this chip again crushes all of its Android (read: Qualcomm) competition.

Here’s another relevant demo on YouTube where the same set of apps are started up in the same sequence, which is repeated, on both the iPhone 7 and the Samsung S7. All in all, the iPhone manages to get through the exercise more than twice as fast as the S7. This is definitely some indication of how users will perceive the responsivity of these devices.

The argument that multi-core was not a good choice for Android is weakened to an extent by this recent AnandTech analysis showing that these phones are actually pretty good at utilising all of their cores:

In the end what we should take away from this analysis is that
Android devices can make much better use of multi-threading than initially expected. There’s very solid evidence that not only are 4.4 big.LITTLE designs validated, but we also find practical
benefits of using 8-core “little” designs over similar single-cluster 4-core SoCs.

My personal experience with the Snapdragon 808 (6 core big.LITTLE) in my BlackBerry PRIV (late 2015 flagship) has been less than stellar. I love the phone for its screen, physical keyboard and other little idiosyncrasies, but the fact that I often have to wait more than a second after tapping an icon or a button before it responds, combined with the terrible Android security story (where the PRIV paradoxically does quite well), makes me wonder about the future smartphone landscape for Android enthusiasts.

Critical Thinking 101: Three super easy steps to spot poppycock on the internet.

Today it happened again.

A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

(quote not by Mark Twain, origin quite interesting)

Someone on facebook forwarded an article that was full of badly written and utterly unsubstantiated conspiracy theories about topic X. (topic X could be anything: politics, health, whatever)

To me, it was instantly clear that the article was 100%, undiluted, hogwash.

Now you probably think that I must have decades of experience separating the internet wheat from the chaff.

While that is true, you too can fortunately very quickly become a wheat-chaff-separation ninja by applying the following three super-easy steps.

1. Ensure that the site with the article is a legitimate source

This is where most people get tripped up. Someone shares something on social media, you see it, and your blood boils, so you reshare without checking.

Next time, break the cycle by quickly checking the address of the news link. This is your first line of defense.

Here are some examples to get you started:

Poppycock: naturalnews.com, worldunity.me, someconspiracy.wordpress.com, … (send me more)

Legitimate: newscientist.com, nytimes.com, theguardian.com, propublica.org

It doesn’t take much practice to spot the pattern.

If the address looks like it could be a BS source, there’s a high probability it is. Remember, we live in the age of fake news, when any idiot can and will put up a website and fill it with misleading information.

Important: Images with text on them shared on Facebook are instantly disqualified. Come on people, we can’t be that gullible!

If you’re still in doubt, continue on to the next step:

2. Search for the site and/or the article contents on Snopes and on Google

Snopes is an absolute goldmine, and it’s free for you to use, so please do.

You can search for any topic or any story, and it will immediately give you a judgement of its veracity and a complete facts-based motivation for its decision.

If you can’t find anything on Snopes, googling the name of the site, or the contents of the story will often reward you with external sources to help you decide. Remember to apply rule 1 to the external sources you find.

3. Find more external LEGITIMATE sources confirming or denying the contents of the article

If after applying steps 1 and 2 you still have some doubt, try to find more external sources, applying rule 1 to each of these of course, that confirm or deny the contents of the article.

If you can’t find any legitimate external sources, that’s usually a sign that the article under study should be flatly ignored.

PROFIT!

Only when you’ve applied all three steps, and they all have helped you to make the call that the link under study is not poppycock, only then consider sharing it with your internet friends.

Furthermore, if you see a suspicious looking article shared by any of your friends, please do gently point them at this post!

Updates

 

Weekly Head Voices #115: So much Dutch.

Monday January 16 to Sunday January 29 of the year 2017 yielded the following possibly mention-worthy tidbits:

On Saturday, January 21, we had the privilege of seeing Herman van Veen perform live at the Oude Libertas Theatre. The previous time was a magical night many years ago in the Royal Theatre Carré in Amsterdam.

Herman van Veen is a living, extremely active and up to date legend. To most Dutch people you’ll ever meet he is a formidable part of their rich cultural landscape.

That evening, we heard so much Dutch spoken in the audience around us, it was easy to imagine that we had been teleported to a strange midsummer night’s performance, all the way back in The Netherlands.

Whatever the case may be, at 72 this artist and superb human being seems to have energy and magic flowing from every limb.

Things which running nerds might find interesting

The Dutch Watch

I had to start facing facts.

The Samsung Gear Fit 2 and I were not going to make a success of our relationship. The GF2 (haha) is great if you’re looking for a hybrid smart-fitness-watch. However, I was using it primarily for running, and then one tends to run (I’m on a roll here) into its limitations.

My inner engineer, the same guy who has a thing for hiking shoes, as they are the couture epitome of function over form, made the call and selected the TomTom Runner 3 Cardio+Music watch (the Runner 3 and the Spark 3 are identical except for styling) to replace my GF2.

Hidden in the name, there’s a subtle hint as to the focus of this wearable.

It has a less pretty monochrome display that manages to be highly visible even in direct sunlight. It does not have a touch screen, instead opting for a less pretty directional control beneath the screen that always manages to select the correct menu option. The menu options remind me of the first TomTom car navigation we bought years ago: Not pretty, but with exactly the right functions, in this case for runs and hikes.

Most importantly, the watch has an explicit function for syncing so-called QuickGPSFix data, so that when you want to start running, it is able to acquire a GPS lock almost immediately. Importantly, the device keeps you informed of its progress via the ugly user interface.

Also, I am now able to pre-load GPX routes. Below you can see me navigating my local mountain like a pro with a sense of direction, when in reality I am an amateur with pathological absence of sense of direction:

That’s me in the corner, losing my Re-Samsung.

Anyways, after being initially quite happy with the GF2, I am now more careful with my first judgement of the Runner 3. What I can say is that the first 40km with it on my arm has been a delight of function-over-form.

P.S. Well done Dutchies. The optical heart rate sensor in the previous Spark was based on technology by South African company LifeQ. I have not been able to find a good reference for the situation in the Spark 3 / Runner 3.

Experiment Alcohol Zero early results: Not what  I was hoping

The completely subjective Experiment Alcohol Zero (EAZ) I announced in my 2016 to 2017 transition post has almost run (err… too soon?) to completion.

November of 2016 was my best running month of that year: I clocked in at 80km.

EAZ started on January 4 and will conclude probably on Friday February 3.

Although I was a much more boring person in January of 2017, I did manage to run 110 km. The runs were all longer and substantially faster than my best runs of 2016.

Subjectively, there was just always energy (and the will) available to go running, and subjectively there was more energy available during the runs. This is probably for a large part due to the vicious upward spiral of better glucose processing, better sleep, hence better exercise, rinse, repeat.

I am planning to use some of this extra energy to sweep these results right under the proverbial carpet in order to try and limit the suffering that it might lead to.

(Seriously speaking, I will have to apply these findings to my pre-EAZ habits in a reasonable fashion. :)

Things which Linux nerds might find interesting

My whole web-empire, including this blog, my serious nerd business blog, and a number of websites I host for friends and family, has been migrated by the wonderful webfaction support to a new much faster shared server in London.

The new server sports 32 Intel Xeon cores, is SSD based and has a newer Linux distribution, so I was able to move over all of my wordpress instances to PHP 7.

Upshot: This blog might feel microscopically quicker! (I am a bit worried with my empire now being stuck in the heart of Article 50. I worry slightly more about a great deal of my data that lives on servers in the USA however. Probably more about that in a future post.)

On the topic of going around the bend, I now have emacs running on my phone, and I’m able to access all of my orgmode notes from there. It looks like this:

One might now ask a pertinent question like: “So Charl, how often do you make use of this wonderful functionality?”

To which I would currently have to answer: “Including showing the screenshot on my blog? Once.”

I’m convinced that it’s going to come in handy at some point.

Things which backyard philosophy nerds might find interesting

With what’s happening in the US at the moment, which is actually just one nasty infestation of the political climate around the globe, I really appreciate coming across more positive messages with advice on how we can move forward as a human race in spite of the efforts of the (libertarian) right.

The World Economic Forum’s Inclusive Growth and Development Report 2017 is one such message. As summarised in this WEF blog post, it tries to answer the question:

How can we increase not just GDP but the extent to which this top-line performance of a country cascades down to benefit society as a whole?

In other words, they present approaches for making our economies more inclusive, thus helping to mitigate the huge gap between rich and poor.

According to the report, the answer entails that national and international economic policies should focus primarily on people and living standards. In order to do this, each country will have to work on a different mix of education, infrastructure, ethics, investment, entrepreneurship and social protection.

The countries that are currently doing the best in terms of having inclusive economies, and are generally shining examples of socialism working extremely well thank you very much, are Norway, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand and Austria. See the blog post for the specific different factors helping each of these countries to perform so well on the Inclusive Development Index (IDI).

Although the countries in the top 10 list all still have room for improvement, it’s great to see that it is actually quite a great idea to combine socialism (which is actually just another word for being further along the human development dimension) with economic survival and even success in today’s world.

(I am still hopeful that one day Gene Roddenberry’s dream of the United Federation of Planets will be realised.

LLAP!)